Mobirise




Blogging since 2009, I'm a 1950s housewife to the bone and I love to share what I've learned with others. I'm a lifelong foodie, raised with Sunday dinners at my grandmother's and daily scratch cooking in my childhood kitchen. I'm a nerdy homeschooling mama of 3, and a wife of 17 years.

I drink tea when I knit and coffee when I do everything else.



From Memorial Day to Labor Day!
Day 1 - Skirt Steak w/ Chimichurri
Day 2 - Top Sirloin w/ Homemade Rub
Day 3 -
Rib Eye w/ Herbed Butter
Day 4 - Rosemary Chicken
Day 5 - Top Sirloin Gyros
Day 6 - Kansas City Style Pork Chops
Day 7 - Steak and Mushroom Kebabs
Day 8 - Dad's Hamurgers, 2.0
Day 9 - Top Sirloin w/ Mushrooms
Day 10 - Kid's Lunch
Day 11 - Chicken Souvlaki
Day 12 - S'mores Cones
Day 13 - Short Ribs



Kitchen & Sewing Skills!
Intro - Syllabus
Lesson 1 - Running & Whipstitch
Lesson 2 - Cookies

Day 2 of 100 Days of Barbecue – Top Sirloin with Homemade Rub

California, Domestic

Day 2 was pretty easy because it’s my husband’s absolute favorite barbecue dinner and I’ve made it so many times over the years I’ve lost count. Top Sirloin with my homemade rub, baked potatoes with chives and parm and a caesar salad. I actually hadn’t made it since we moved back to California, so he was so happy when he saw me working on it this morning.

Making a dry rub or a paste yourself is one of those things that seems like too much work until you just do it. It does require a lot of ingredients, so you can either do it and create a well stoked pantry at the same time or you can buy some of these spices here and there until you have collected them all. Also look for spice blends that cost the same as one jar but have three or four spices in them (like an ‘Italian blend’ will have oregano and basil, for example). I just literally whisk all of these together in roughly equal parts with the exception of cayenne pepper and cumin, for those two I use much less. Their flavors can be overwhelming and while I do think they add to the overall flavor of the finished spice mix (or I just wouldn’t use them), you really don’t need much. The garlic though, I use fresh and I slather it on the steak with the back of a spoon.
sea salt
black pepper
dill seed
coriander
red pepper flakes
dehydrated onion flakes
parsley
celery seed
basil
marjoram
oregano
thyme
cayenne pepper (just a pinch)
coriander
dry mustard
rosemary
cumin (just a pinch)

Other than these spices (or mixes or a prepared dry rub) you’ll need…

enough canola oil to almost cover your steak in whatever dish you’re marinating it in
3 teaspoons minced garlic
top sirloin steak

 

I always start by pouring some canola oil in the dish I’m using, and then placing the steak on top to see where the oil level is. I don’t really want the steak swimming in it, because it’s just not necessary, but I do want to make sure it’s getting enough. Then I flip the steak so there is oil on the topside, and I gently rub a very small amount of the spice mixture onto the steak. I use the back of a spoon to spread about half the garlic over it and then I flip it over and do the same. I usually check on it every few hours, sprinkle more spice mix on it, flip it, and do it again.

 

Now, you fire up your grill. For years we used gas grills, but I am so obsessed with our new Weber charcoal grill. One of our neighbors has one and he was always experimenting with flavors by adding different kinds of wood chips to his charcoal. We decided that since we needed a new grill anyway, we’d get the best charcoal grill we could find and really get into it. More on that later this summer, right now I am still getting the hang of heating all my coals evenly and getting them to hold a flame. I was way better today than yesterday, so I’m making progress.

How long you cook your steak is entirely up to personal preference, of course. If you like it very rare, you will not need to cook it long at all, and if you like it very well done it’ll be on there longer. Totally up to you. We usually cook until medium rare and then take it out to rest. Remember that meat will continue cooking for a little while from the inside out after you’ve removed it from the heat. Catch it just before you think it’s ready and by the time you cut it, it will be.

Serve with whatever sides strike your fancy! I always serve it with baked potatoes and a ceaser, but I usually also have corn on the cob as well. I couldn’t find any this week!

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